Race Recap: Triffic Trail 10k, Trent Park

Following closely on the heels of Thursday’s Golden Stag Mile, on Sunday I took part in the Triffic Trail 10k in Trent Park. I had heard good things about this race from fellow Heathsiders so was looking forward to it. Remembering how F enjoyed last September’s trail 10k on the Heath, I convinced him to sign up and join me. What a good sport! He returned from a work trip to Boston the day before and, despite his jet lag, gamely got up with me on Sunday morning for a bit of trail running.

Gazing towards the greenery

I’d never been to Trent Park, and it is a treat: undulating terrain varying from grassy to gravelly to woodsy with a bit of pavement thrown in. Rolling hills and loads of space to enjoy some peace and quiet. As we started the race, I registered how much quieter it was than a road race — there was hardly any external noise of cars, sirens, etc. Just a few hundred runners peacefully enjoying the trails, with the occasional cheering marshal or group of supporters.

Pre-race with Alice and Tom

I find trail races to be less stressful than road races, in part because I don’t run them as often (with the exception of cross country). Plus, trail race times can’t really be compared with road races times — much less pressure! I was hoping to enjoy the race and push a bit if I felt good.

F and I set off together and ran the first kilometer in a brisk 4:38. Tom, a fellow Heathsider, joined our mini pack and we ran alongside each other for the second kilometer. For the next few kilometers, Tom and I swapped places and kept each other going: he’d pass me on uphills, I’d catch him on the downhills. Through the 5k in 24:48, fatigue started setting in as I realized there were still 5k to go! I couldn’t keep up with Tom on the next uphill, so let him go.

My 6th kilometer was the slowest of the race at 5:37, but I managed to run through the slump and make up some time on the downhills. F was not more than a few steps behind me for most of the race, which really motivated me to keep running! I was tiring at 8km but F pushed me up the last gradual uphill and then there was only 1km to go. The last 800m or so was a long, grassy straight with uneven footing that, with a headwind, felt endless. I didn’t have much at all to kick but managed to come in under 50:00, in a chip time of 49:44 (8:01/mile, 4:58/km) — very pleased with that!

Heathsiders post-race. Photo credit: Satu’s phone

There was a good contingent of Heathsiders at the Triffic Trail 10k and some great results. The weather was partly cloudy and not too warm, and the goody bags and t-shirts were solid (except for those weird cinnamon soft drinks…). All in all, a great event and highly recommended!

YMCA North London / Crouch End 10k – 2017 edition

Another May is here: time for the annual (26th, to be exact) YMCA North London Fun Run & Festival, featuring the Crouch End 10k road race. I’ve taken part in this great local event for the past few years: I’ve run (2014 — it was so hot), marshaled (2015), run (last year — slowly), and run again this year. Here’s my recap of the 2017 race:

I arrived in Priory Park — a very short jog from home — as the traditional aerobics warmup was beginning. I didn’t join in, but wandered around finding fellow Heathsiders to chat with, while swinging my arms and shaking my legs out to loosen things up. This year was warmer than last year but not as hot as 2014. The weather was partly sunny — I’m glad I wore my sunglasses, as the sun got strong on the second lap — and about 59F/15C with a light breeze. Not quite perfect running conditions, but not too bad considering what it could have been like.

Traditional photo of the aerobics warmup. Pretty sure I got almost the exact same shot last year.

I have finally started to feel properly fit again after my longish layoff over the Christmas holidays: I’ve done a number of “long” (it’s all relative) 11-12km runs in the past month or two, though speedwork has been lacking. I did return to the track the other week for the first time in a while and hope to make it a more regular occurrence throughout the rest of the spring and summer. All of that is a long-winded way of saying I’m in pretty-good-but-not-PB-shape. My goal for this year’s Crouch End 10k was to run under 50 minutes, with an ideal time of around 48 minutes.

My rough plan for the race was to run the first 5km steady, between 24 and 25 minutes, then negative split (run a faster second half) with whatever I had left. I knew the first kilometer might be quick with the excitement of the start and getting swept along in the flow of runners, so I allowed for that and decided to settle into a steadier pace once the pack thinned out. I’ve been throwing kilometer surges into my longer runs, so I also knew that I could finish strong with a fast final kilometer.

The race went more or less to plan. I ran alongside a fellow Heathsider for part of the first kilometer, and was pleased to go through 1km in 4:42. I was surprised that my second kilometer was even quicker, at 4:36, although looking at the elevation profile it was slightly net downhill. Alun caught me up around then; we had a brief chat about goal times and then he sped ahead.

Photo credit: Maz St H.

After the slog uphill, we descended into Ally Pally park and along the newly paved section that was lined with cheering families. This bit is sneakily uphill — I’m glad I re-read my previous race recaps before running this year, as they reminded me of that fact. We wheeled down and around onto Priory Road, where I gave a wave to Chris, a fellow CEFC singer who was spectating (there were a few other singers running — or is it “running singers”?).

Marc Gardner photography: Adult 10K &emdash; IMG_6576

Photo credit: Marc Gardner Photography.

Passing my favorite part of the course — the group blasting “YMCA” — around halfway gave me a boost: I went through 5km in 24:15, right around my target. My 6th kilometer was also quick (4:40), which allowed me to ease off a bit going up the big hill for the second time. When I entered Ally Pally park again with 2km to go, I spotted Caroline up ahead and made it my goal to catch her (sorry, Caroline, I can’t help it!). I was definitely struggling by this point but dug in and repeated my mantra: I’m strong, I’m healthy, and I’m fit. If I could get to 9km, I could pick it up for one more kilometer.

Marc Gardner photography: Adult 10K &emdash; IMG_7187

Believe it or not, I am actually running in this photo! Photo credit: Marc Gardner Photography.

So that’s what I did. As soon as I got onto Priory Road for the final straight before curving back into the park, I lifted my knees, pumped my arms, and turned it up a notch. Perhaps it was a bit early, but I stayed strong and even had a bit left for a brief kick to the finish, pipping a couple of guys right before the line. I finished in a gun time of 48:08 and chip time of 48:02 (I’m going with the chip time — that’s 4:49/km or 7:45/mile pace). I was the 32nd woman out of 472 and finished 243rd out of 1,100 runners. I’m really pleased with my time — it’s just about what I expected I could do based on my current fitness levels, and it’s my quickest time on this course. Can’t complain about that!

For you stat nerds out there interested in my splits. It’s not the best course for even pacing. Click to enlarge.

The 3rd and 7th kilometers (6.5-7.5km, to be exact) are the hardest in this race, heading uphill parallel to the train tracks and past Alexandra Palace Station. Those were my slowest splits of the race — hard on the second lap, when my energy levels naturally dip around 7km. It helped to have a woman in a Trent Park vest in my sights for a large part of the race, and we flip flopped a couple of times. It’s always nice to have another runner to keep an eye on, and there were plenty of other Heathsiders around to encourage as they passed me or as I passed them.

The Crouch End 10k course is notorious for its difficulty. I don’t think I’ve ever heard a single runner say they actually enjoy the twists, turns, and hills. At least it gives us something to bond over! And the odd bollard, sharp turn, and cutting on and off the pavement certainly keep you on your toes. The support around the course can’t be beat, and it’s always great to have loads of Heathsiders marshaling, too, for that extra special personalized support of “Come on, Heathside” and “Go, Tammela”!


Race Recap: Regent’s Park 10k (winter series #1)

A couple months ago, F and a few of his work colleagues decided to run an autumn 10k together. F asked me if I wanted to join — of course! — and I helped him look for races in October. We settled on the Mornington Chasers Regent’s Park 10k — the first race of their “winter” series. Here’s my recap of the race.

Post-race. The woman taking our photo encouraged us to strike an appropriately celebratory pose!

Post-race. The woman taking our photo encouraged us to strike an appropriately celebratory pose!

I’ve run a couple of 10ks over the past month and am finally starting to do some faster workouts (hello, hill repeats and Heathside roller coaster!), so my goal for this race was to run under 50:00 and ideally around 48:00. Knowing that Regent’s Park is pretty flat — though there are some sneaky inclines along the course! — made me confident that I could probably be close to my goal time. F and I cycled down to the park and met his co-workers, then took off our layers and lined up to start, still a bit chilly in the brisk 50F/10C morning air.

As we started off on the first of three equal laps, F pulled away and I let him go, noticing that my pace was already pretty quick and not wanting to push too early. Sure enough, I went through the first kilometer in 4:31, feeling pretty good but with a small side cramp. I dialed back a bit, knowing that I “only” needed to average around 4:45/km to run 48 minutes. I caught up with F just after the 2km marker, and we ran together until 6km. Running together helped both of us, especially as we realized we’d gone out a bit too fast and had to slow down for the 5th kilometer (5:10).

At 6km, I felt more sprightly than F so started pulling ahead. I managed the next two kilometers just under 5:00 each — the typical mid-race slump — before hitting the third lap and finally feeling like the end was starting to be in sight. Passing Cookie Monster for the last time (yes, there was a marshal dressed in a Cookie Monster costume), I pressed on past the fountain and around towards the zoo (hello, dromedaries!). By the final straightaway, I didn’t have much left for a kick but managed to finish in 48:03 (chip time) — right around where I’d hoped to be. I was 118th/323 and the 26th woman of 122. F came in just over a minute behind me, also under 50:00. Overall, I’m pleased with how the race went and am glad to see my fitness improving.

I like these Regent’s Park 10k races in part because the 3-lap course passing through the finish line helps you divide the race into thirds. I attempted to evenly pace the race by laps. That didn’t go quite to plan, with 15:31, 16:49, and 15:39 laps (there’s that mid-race slump again), but it’s something to aim for. Although some people think the course is too slippery and narrow at points, I quite like running in Regent’s Park and taking in the sights of ducks, dogs, and greenery while running along. Always a fun morning out.