Tag Archives: Parliament Hill

Race Recap: 2018 London Cross Country Championships, Parliament Hill

Photo credit: Andrew W

Background: When planning my autumn racing calendar, I knew I’d miss the first Met League and Sunday League cross country races (let’s call it XC to save words) in October and November due to travel. So I impulsively signed up to run the London Cross Country Championships on Parliament Hill as part of Heathside’s women’s team. It’s hard to say “no” to such a local race, but it would also be my first XC race in a year, and in a fast field – I was one of the slowest Heathside women on the roster. Upon perusing my blog archives, I also realized that I hadn’t run this particular race since 2013! It was high time to rectify that.

Goal: Not having run cross country in a year, I set modest expectations for myself: not to be the last Heathsider to finish, and to run under 30 minutes (I did this race in 28:08 five years ago).

Race strategy: Run by feel and use the downhills. Don’t trip or fall and don’t worry too much about time. Try to enjoy it!

Weather & outfit: It was a sunny autumn day and relatively warm for the season. The temperature was about 12C/54F – maybe warmer in the sun. I wore shorts, Heathside vest, and dusted off my cross country spikes for the occasion.

The start. Photo by Andrew W.

The race: It had been pretty dry in London so the course consisted of “very firm ground with lots of holes,” as fellow Heathsider D put it on his Strava description of the race. That’s not to say the lack of mud made it easier. If anything, the hard ground was less forgiving on my thinly shod feet – I could feel every hump and bump in the terrain and had to work hard to balance myself and not turn an ankle. I definitely wobbled a number of times. But that’s the challenge of cross country for you! Time to do some more core work…

The Parliament Hill XC course famously starts by running straight up the long, south-facing slope of – you guessed it – Parliament Hill. The first kilometer felt endless, although I was pleased to go through it in 5:01. It doesn’t get any easier after the long hill: the course undulates up and down grassy fields, through pockets of woods and across some paved paths. There is never a step on perfectly flat ground. It is relentless.

Nevertheless, I had committed to it, so I kept running. My second and third kilometers were faster than the first. Clubmate A passed me at 3.5km as I was struggling up a steep hill for the second time. We’re over halfway, I breathed to her. That fourth kilometer was the hardest. I felt a bit sick – it’s hard to fuel properly for midday/afternoon races – and my legs had lost the spring they had in the first lap. Just relax, keep breathing, be patient, I told myself.

Knowing the last kilometer was mostly downhill, I resolved to save my energy until then for the final push to the finish. I picked it up for a swift final kilometer – 3:55 – but didn’t quite have the kick to catch anyone at the end.

Heathside women post-race. Photo from Emily R.

The result: I finished the race in 28:04 (7:31/mi = 4:41/kmand came 123rd of 311 women finishers. I was the 15th of 20 Heathside women running, and ran this course 4 seconds faster than I did five years ago. Not much, but I’ll take it. The best news is that our leading quartet of women combined to win and become the London XC champs 2018! Brilliant running, Heathsiders.

This was a hard race. I struggled to get in a racing mindset and didn’t respond well to challenges from other runners. I forgot how hard cross country running is on your feet, ankles, and calves. Time for some stretching and rolling! But I’m glad I did it and now know I need to do some more hilly trail training.

Post-race: Women’s team photo the home to a hot shower and F’s freshly-baked sausage rolls. Yum!

Next up: Probably Perivale 5 in a couple of weeks, although I may trade it in for a Sunday League XC race. I’ll see how I feel.


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Race Recap: Jubilee Hall Trust 5k Trail Race

Ready to run

Background: In retrospect, I’m not really sure why I entered this 5k trail race in the Parliament Hill area of Hampstead Heath. I could have just run Hampstead Heath parkrun…for free. But I had pleasant memories of running the Jubilee Hall Trust 10k a couple of years ago, and the entry fee went towards the British Heart Foundation and the Jubilee Hall Trust‘s work to help people improve their heart health, so why not? I also thought this race would be good hill training and preparation for cross country season (although again, I could’ve just done HH parkrun).

Goal: I had a full-on workweek leading up to the Saturday morning race, so didn’t have high expectations for my run. However, based on my 10k a couple of weeks ago, I thought I could aim for 23:00 or under. My stretch goal was to aim for close to 22:00, but knowing how hilly the course was, I knew it would be difficult.

Race strategy: Run by feel and use the downhills. See what happens.

Weather & outfit: A beautiful late summer/early autumn morning: warm in the sun and cool in the shade. Around 20C/68F. I wore shorts, Heathside vest, and sunglasses. Although this was a trail race, the weather has been dry and part of the race was on paved paths, so I didn’t wear my trail shoes but instead went for my new Brooks Ghost 11 trainers (I’m a fan!).

Photo by Phil Rumbelow

Photo credit: Phil Rumbelow

The race: F and I jogged the 2 miles down to Parliament Hill together but of course were mega-early so I collected my number and hung around for longer than ideal. I was not warm anymore by the time the race started. I was one of the only people in a club vest; this was very much a local charity race, which gave it a low-key feel. The small field of 31 5k runners lined up first, and off we went up and over the grassy knoll and down to the paved paths by the ponds.

Only one other woman was in front of me but she was way ahead so I tried to settle into my own rhythm. My legs felt heavy and I was disappointed when the first kilometer went by in 4:34. There goes my 22:00 goal, I thought. Oh well, just do your best. These hills are killer. Around past the Ladies’ Pond and into the wooded part of the course. Mostly uphill. Second kilometer: 5:12. Ugh. Just keep running. Use the downhills in the second half of the course. With two kilometers to go, we finally had some reprieve from climbing. I pumped my arms and tried to work my legs as fast as they could go. My fourth kilometer was 4:11 and I brought it home in 4:06 pace, glad to finish and not have to run another lap like the 10k runners. I ended up running the entire race pretty much on my own, which didn’t make it any easier.

Photo by Phil Rumbelow

Finishing. Photo credit: Phil Rumbelow.

The result: I finished the race in a 21:46 chip time (7:29/mi = 4:39/kmand came 6th of 31 5k finishers and 2nd woman of 18. Although my time looks fast, the course was actually 4.68km rather than 5k, so I was actually on track for about a 23:15 finish time.

This was not a particularly fun race. I was happy that the course was short. My legs felt sluggish and the hills were hard. I’m glad I did it, though, and it definitely counts as a good hill/XC training run if nothing else!

Post-race: Slow jog home with goody bag, including a decent technical t-shirt in navy – a color I didn’t have yet!

Next up: The annual Middlesex 10k in two weeks. It’s flat, so hopefully I can run a good time. I think I need to incorporate more speedwork, though, as I’ve struggled to average under 4:38/km in recent races and workouts. I need a bit of a boost to get under that threshold.


Race Recap: Jubilee Hall Trust 10k, Hampstead Heath

Ah, Hampstead Heath, you are one of my absolute favorite places in London. Being on the Heath is like being in a different world; you can forget that you live in a metropolis of 8 million+ people. Sheer bliss.

View from Parliament Hill in July 2016.

View from Parliament Hill in July 2016.

And in this case, a bit of healthy pain to go with that bliss. F and I tromped over to Parliament Hill on a gray and windy Saturday morning for the Jubilee Hall Trust “Run for your life” 10k trail race. J ran it last year and convinced me to sign up, then had to miss it due to another commitment, so F was able to run in her place. The group of 100-odd 10k runners had a low-key feel, with only a handful of us wearing club jerseys. It’s nice to run a race with a lot of “normal” runners from the community sometimes — a bit like the Crouch End 10k.

Pre-race

Pre-race

The course started at the bottom of Parliament Hill, near the athletics track. One of the race marshals led a remarkably effective 5-minute warmup just before the start; it did more to warm us up than the slow 4-minute jog F and I took. Then we were off for two 5km laps of Parliament Hill. (Side note: a few of us only had 9.3km on our Garmins after the race, so we’re not sure it was a full 10km long.) Distance discrepancies aside, it was a tough course: undulating, uneven terrain — mostly trails — up and around the Heath. Luckily the ground was dry, and the cool, breezy weather was actually welcome once we got going.

jubileehalltrust10k-pace

As you can see from my splits, the hills definitely affected the pace. F and I had agreed to run the first 7-8km together — it’s great to have a partner you can be active with! — and then if one of us was feeling good towards the end, (s)he could pick it up. That ended up being F, as I felt pretty knackered after about 7km; I managed to pick my pace up for the last kilometer or so, but it wasn’t quite enough to catch him!

Overall, I’m pleased with my run (50:18) and was happy to treat the race as: 1) a way to spend time with F after a busy week, 2) my “long” run for the week, 3) good general training, and 4) a preview to cross country season! Running on the Heath is one of the great joys of living in north London, and it was F’s first time doing so, which made it extra special to look around and take in the woodland beauty.


 

Race Recap: SEAA Cross Country Championships, Parliament Hill

Note to self: next year, do not sign up to race every weekend for five weeks in a row. Less than a week after a great 10-mile road race, I was feeling less-than-enthusiastic to race again, but nonetheless dragged — well, cycled — myself over to Parliament Hill for the South of England Athletic Association’s (SEAA — the same organization that put on the London XC Champs in November) Cross Country Championships. This race featured similar Parliament Hill terrain, but the course was longer than November’s: up to 8km from 6km for the women, and the poor men had to run 15km instead of the usual 8km!

Remind me why I torture myself with this? Oh, right, for the muddy legs the glory, of course.

Anyone have a chisel to get the mud off? Photo credit: ESM.

Anyone have a chisel to get the mud off? Photo credit: ESM.

This weekend’s course had been graced with quite a bit of rain over the past week or so, which meant ankle-deep bogs — more like mud soup — at many points, and thick, sticky (and smelly) mud at others. Only on the two or three flat and dryish sections did I feel as if I were actually running forwards…until I would hit another deep patch and be slowed back down to a slog.

In a word, the course was horrible. Worse than the most recent Met League outing. And did I mention it was longer than usual? At least we had some sunshine during the race. But the ground conditions, coupled with my trying-not-to-get-burned-out brain, made it a tough race. I swear, only sheer willpower kept me moving and enabled me to finish (final time: 42:07 for the hilly, muddy 8km/5mi course). Others probably felt similarly — it wasn’t pretty, but we got through it. Well done, everyone! It certainly was a sight to see/be part of so many runners swarming across the playing fields and up Parliament Hill at the start.

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Race Recap: London Cross Country Championships, Parliament Hill

Ah, Parliament Hill. You offer great views of the center of London but you are a b**** to run up! At least that’s how many people made it out to be, leading up to the London Cross Country Championships this weekend. In reality, it wasn’t as impossibly uphill as I’d imagined. There were quite a few ups, but there were also a good deal of downs and the course itself was quite lovely, snaking its way around Parliament Hill and Kenwood on Hampstead Heath. (It didn’t hurt that the day was lovely, too: mid-40sF and sunny.) The course was also a pretty technical: there were a few mud holes — though they weren’t as bad as some years have been, I was told — and lots of bumpy/hole-y grass sections.

Because this race was a championship, each club had to enter specific names beforehand. I didn’t get my name in early enough, but a few of the ladies who had entered didn’t end up running. I ran as “CM” rather than as myself, which just means the result isn’t under my name.

photo credit: Steve W.

photo credit: Steve W.

Earlier last week I read a short article on cross country and hill running, which talked about how to effectively run downhill. I knew that it’s important to let gravity help you down the hills, but what I learned from the article was to use a short, quick stride rather than let your strides get long and overreaching as you barrel down. I tried the short, quick downhill stride technique at Parliament Hill and it definitely made my feel faster and more controlled. Instead of lengthening my stride downhill and then having to adjust it when the course flattened out again, I found myself readjusting to flattening — or rising — terrain more quickly after a downhill, since my turnover was still fast. Shorter downhill strides also stressed my quads less and helped me stay balanced on the tricky terrain.

The finish was longer than I anticipated: we ran down through a chute but then had to turn left around a corner and still had 150-200m until the finish line. Thanks to teammate D’s cheering (“Come on, Tamm!”), I was able to rev up and have a great kick, passing one woman and then pushing to catch another about 5 meters before the finish. I finished the 6km (3.73mi) course in about 28:08 (7:32/mi pace) — not as fast as last week but given that the course was tougher and I was running on sore legs, I’m pretty pleased with the result.

Apparently all of the Heathside women did well: our “A” team finished second in their division, and our “B” and “C” teams were first in their divisions. (Don’t ask me how the divisions/scoring work — I’m still trying to figure that out.) Well done, ladies!

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