Tag Archives: race

Race Recap: Perivale 5, for the fourth time

It’s the first weekend of December, and you know what that means? Time for the annual Perivale 5 — a flat, suburban race that is always well-organized by Ealing Southall and Middlesex AC (water, banana, a t-shirt, and a Twix bar after the race? Yes, please!).

It was a glorious day for a road race: a chilly 3-4 degrees C, but bright and sunny with little wind. Some of us were hemming and hawing about what to wear given the cold, but once we warmed up I was glad of my wardrobe choice: thicker capris, a t-shirt under my vest, and gloves (which I even pulled off in the last mile). I hadn’t really run since the previous weekend, as I had a bit of a stomach virus during the week. It didn’t keep me from work but definitely kept me from doing any extra physical activity. I thought I still might be able to manage finishing in 38 minutes but felt quite nervous so decided to see how it went and listen to my body.

The start was slowish, with lots of runners bunched up on a narrow sidewalk, but I managed a 4:54 first kilometer and once it thinned out was able to settle into a pace of just under 5:00/km. I knew I wasn’t on pace for 38 minutes so readjusted my goal to aim for under 39.

My second and third kilometers were 4:49 and 4:51 and I was starting to warm up and get into a good rhythm while steadily passing a runner here and there. I faded a little in the fourth kilometer — my slowest, as you can see from my Strava race analysis below — but was buoyed by making it to the halfway point. You can do it. Just 2 miles to go, I thought as I passed the 3-mile marker.

It helped to pass another Heathsider just after 3 miles — he told me that Gabi was just up ahead, so I made it my goal to try and catch up with her before the end of the race (thanks/sorry, Gabi!). That was enough motivation to make my sixth kilometer my fastest, at 4:37, as I caught up to Gabi near the 4-mile marker and pushed on towards the finish. Once on the track for the last 350 meters, I tried to quicken my pace as much as my legs would let me, and had a good last lap to finish in 38:37 (7:43/mi, 4:49/km pace) — not brilliant (and nowhere close to my PB from three years ago), but a bit faster than I’ve run Perivale for the past two years, and a negative split! I’ll take that as an achievement. I was knackered at the end and glad to share these cookies and H&S’s delicious banana cake with the rest of the Heathside contingent.

In case any nerds are interested in my race analysis, courtesy of Strava.

In case any nerds are interested in my race analysis, courtesy of Strava.


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Race Recap: 2016 YMCA North London / Crouch End 10k

My running has not been spectacular for the past 6-8 months. After a 5k PR/PB in September, life got busy and stressful. Rather than enjoying running as a stress reliever, as I always have, running became a struggle. Burnout? I don’t think so. Doing too much in all aspects of my life? Possibly. Anyway, I backed off the running for a while. Only in the past few months have I become consistent again, trying to get out for three runs a week without the pressure of track workouts or races. I wanted to start enjoying running again — and I am getting there! It helps to have supportive and understanding running friends. Here’s a recap of my first race since December.

Post race. Photo credit: Tom Hosking Photography (https://www.facebook.com/TomHoskingPhotography/)

Post race group of friendly Heathsiders. Photo credit: Tom Hosking Photography (https://www.facebook.com/TomHoskingPhotography/)

I last ran the YMCA North London / Crouch End 10k two years ago, on a miserably hot day, and marshaled last year on another hot day. Today’s weather was sunny but not too warm (~50F/10C) — much more pleasant for tackling the infamous hills around Ally Pally that make up part of the 2-lap course. Since I have not been doing any speedwork or long runs, my approach to today’s race was very much about using it as a training run and getting back into slightly longer distances. I set myself an achievable goal of finishing this year’s race under 1 hour. And it would’ve been silly not to take up the opportunity of running an organized race that starts less than a mile from home!

As always, the Crouch End 10k has a fantastic atmosphere. I loved arriving to see the crowd being led in the traditional aerobics warm up by an enthusiastic instructor. I found some fellow Heathsiders, congratulated them on recent marathon and half marathon times, and lined up for the start. In a way this is Heathside’s home race, so lots of club members were out running, marshaling, and supporting.

Aerobics warm up for the Crouch End 10k

Aerobics warm up for the Crouch End 10k

I’ll spare you the details of each kilometer, but it was fun to navigate the twists and turns of Crouch End neighborhoods with over 1,000 other runners. There is always so much support along the course, and this year was no different. I loved seeing lots of young people and families outside to cheer on the runners. It was great to be recognized by many of the marshals (most of them being fellow Heathside runners) and being egged on by shouts of, “Come on, Heathside!”, thanks to my club vest (“vest” is UK-speak for singlet or sleeveless top). The highlights for me were running across Ally Pally park — although there’s that sneaky gradual uphill section partway along — and running past the house blaring “YMCA” just before the 5k mark.

I went through 5k in a comfortable 27:33, so knew I could finish under an hour. My pace wasn’t fast but it was maintainable, so I kept chugging along and reminding myself that this was a training run and there was no pressure to race. It can be hard to hold back in a race situation, as the atmosphere and other runners can have you chomping at the bit, but I was happy to run along at my own pace and smile at the crowds, other runners, and beautiful weather. It was just great to be out celebrating fitness and life in the springtime!

I finished in 56:06, probably my slowest recorded 10k race, but I am okay with that. I am glad to have done it and gained the confidence that I can still run longer distances (I know, a 10k is no marathon, but distance is relative to the runner and his/her baseline). Now I can focus on getting some speed back and building up my long runs. Great job to all runners and especially Heathsiders! The race organisation was great and the marshaling was top notch.


Race Recap: Middlesex 10k 2015

‘Twas a crisp, sunny morning in early October, as club runners turned out in droves to run the Middlesex 10k in Victoria Park (one of my favorite London road race locations). I’d forgotten what a competitive race this was — it serves as the Middlesex County road race championships, so lots of fast runners show up hoping to nab a medal.

I had no such hopes, but set my personal goal at a somewhat ambitious 45:00. Since I ran a big 5k PB a week and a half ago and felt on the edge of a cold all week, I wasn’t too bothered about trying to gun for a PR/PB in this race. 45:00 would be quite close to my PB from this past April, so I knew it might be a stretch. In terms of pacing, I was aiming to run relatively consistent splits as close to 4:30/km as possible until the last couple of kilometers, when I planned to push to the finish.

Things were going well as J and I settled into a nice pace together. A 4:17 first kilometer before we settled into just over 4:30/km for the next few. An annoying boy around 3km threw us off by dancing around in front of runners before stopping right in our path — I barely squeezed past him while Jo had to dodge at the last second; we both yelled at him (I believe “idiot!” came out of my mouth) and alerted a marshal to the kid’s dangerous behavior.

J and I slowed a bit in the 5th kilometer and came through the 5k in 22:50. That was still on track to run under 46:00, so I was fine with it but knew I’d have to dig in and try to pick up the pace in the second half of the race. The next kilometer was a quicker 4:31 before I started to pull away from J as we approached the last lap. Perhaps I picked it up a bit too much, as my 7th and 8th kilometers were 4:23 and 4:43 respectively…oops! Probably should’ve tried to split the difference and stick to 4:30s. With 2 kilometers to go, I started pushing towards the finish. Things went well until 500m to go, when I suddenly felt like I had hardly anything left. I was able to fend off a runner behind me for the finish, but I didn’t have much kick.

My final time was 45:37 (average pace 7:20/mi, 4:33/km), good for 208th/292 overall and 36th of 79 women (told you it was a competitive race). I’m pleased, as it’s my second fastest 10k time to date. What did I learn from this race? I definitely need more practice pacing 10ks.

Middlesex10k-Oct2015-Splits

Moral of the story: 10k pacing is hard!

Heathside runners did well in the race, picking up quite a few of the Middlesex championships medals in various individual and team categories. S ran a big PB and J and C also ran well; we all enjoyed some smitten kitchen apple slab pie afterwards.

will run for pie

will run for pie

Up next: Cross country! I’ve got some snazzy new spikes and am excited to get back to the muddy hills after missing all of last season.

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Race Recap: Thames Towpath 10

About 10 of us non-marathoning Heathsiders ventured down to Chiswick this morning for a brisk run along the river in the aptly named Thames Towpath 10. Conditions were good: partly cloudy and around 7C with a bit of a breeze.

This was only my second 10-miler and I had to beat last year’s Fred Hughes time of 1:16:17. I knew that was possible, as Fred Hughes is hilly and this race was really flat. My goal was 1:15:00, which meant averaging 7:30 minutes/mile. I chunked that together in my head to aim to be under/around 30:00 at 4 miles and under an hour at 8 miles. Strategy-wise, I decided to go out at (rather than under) pace so as not to burn out in the last few miles.

The TT10 is advertised as a ‘multi-terrain’ 10-mile race, and it certainly is. Almost half the race is along the gravelly Thames towpath (who’d have thought?!) — this made it hard to get into a good rhythm but did keep me on my toes. It was also nice to see rowers gliding along the river down below and others out enjoying the morning.

Once out of the start (an awkward lap-and-a-half of a grassy football/soccer field), J and I tried to settle into a pace together. It’s great to race with training partner whose style you are familiar with. Our Garmins showed different average paces, but time-wise we were on target: just under 15:00 at 2 miles and just under 30:00 at 4 miles.

Shortly past halfway, we turned off the gravelly towpath and onto…a grassy field! ‘Just pretend it’s cross country’, I said to J as we ran across the thankfully-not-muddy field. A few miles on pavement helped the legs move along as the middle miles took a mental toll. J pulled ahead of me at 6 miles as I fell a bit off the pace, but I gritted my teeth, popped a couple of gummies, and caught up with her around 7 miles.

Come on, you have to make it to 8 miles in under an hour, I told myself. Pushing on, it was back to the towpath for a brief jaunt, where I finally seemed to get into a rhythm and hit 8 miles in 59:59 — right on target! Two miles to go. Fellow Heathsider R was not far ahead and I made it my goal to try and close the gap between us.

We turned off the towpath and back to pavement for the final mile or so. My Garmin chirped at 15km: let’s go, only about 1km to the finish. I shouted encouragement to R as we went up and over the bridge and I stuck right behind him as we turned the corner for the last 200 meters around the grassy field. Kick, legs — catch him! But I couldn’t quite and R crossed the line just 1 second ahead of me (although our chip times are identical according to the results).

My final time1:14:37 (average pace 7:27/mile) for a PR/PB! I came 6th woman of 214 and was the 100th finisher of 524. Plus, J finished right behind me and another Heathsider, S, came in 10th woman — combined, our finishes won us the 1st ladies’ team prize. Can’t complain about that!

Photo credit: West 4 Harriers

Photo credit: West 4 Harriers

The Thames Towpath 10 was a very well-organised race with fantastic marshals and a pretty nice haul of goodies: everyone got a Fuller’s (they sponsored) pint glass, many of us scored colourful buffs/snoods, and winners got a coffee mug and a case of Fuller’s London Pride beer (F was quite pleased about that!).

Race Recap: Regent’s Park Summer 10k Series #1

It’s still bank holiday weekend. We’ve already ventured to central London for the National Gallery, ramen and amazing cinnamon buns; made Moroccan food and enjoyed it with friends; and done a bunch of nothing. Another great way to enjoy a long weekend is to get in some quality exercise — this time in the form of a race. There is a “summer” 10k series in Regent’s Park on the first Sunday of every month from April to September. I missed the races last summer but thought this weekend would be the perfect time to test my speed on the relatively flat and peaceful paths of Regent’s Park. Here’s my recap of the race:

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Going into this race, I knew I had a good chance of running a 10k PR/PB for the following reasons:

  1. My previous PR/PB was not actually that fast: 45:41 from 2013’s Middlesex 10k in flat Victoria Park. And that was really only my second 10k, so I knew I could improve on that time.
  2. Training has been going well. I haven’t been running crazy mileage, but I have finally been getting to the track consistently for Tuesday and the occasional Thursday speed workouts. Also, my recent long runs have all been over 10k, which gave me some confidence for running the distance.

I knew if I felt good I could pull off a PR/PB. Breaking 45:00 was my rough goal, with the more specific aim of 44:30. A 3-lap course meant that to break 45:00 I’d need to be under 15:00 for each lap.

I also changed my race strategy. In the past year or two, I’ve been going out a bit conservatively in races, building over the course of the distance and finishing faster. I think that was partly due to lack of confidence in my ability to hold a quick pace; the lack of confidence probably came from not doing as much speed work. But since getting my track legs back, I feel more confident at a faster pace, so I decided to go out pretty hard for this race and try to maintain it through to the end.

Generally, the strategy worked. My first kilometer was a quick 4:17 to wake me up before settling into a just-maintainable pace of slightly under 4:30/km. Of course, each kilometer fluctuated a bit. I was slightly slower through 5km — 22:15 — than I’d hoped to be, but I still knew I could run a PR/PB with that. I went through the second lap in 30:00 so had to pick it up to finish under 45:00.

My 5th and 8th kilometers were the slowest (4:37 and 4:39, respectively), but I dug in at 8km and gritted my teeth to 9km (4:29) before really pushing home in a 4:11 final kilometer. Man, that last kilometer felt long! An emerging side cramp didn’t help either; I hardly had any kick to the finish, but I did pass a guy just 10-15 meters before the line.

Final chip time: 44:44 for a new 10k (6.2mi) PR/PB! (Average pace: 4:28/km or 7:13/mile). I came 12th lady out of 165 and 80th overall of 381 finishers, so not too shabby there. I’m pleased to have run under 45:00 and know that I can — or should be able to — further improve on the time I ran today. It felt good to run a PR/PB for the first time in over a year.

The addition of a “new” (i.e., Gabi’s old) Garmin helped a lot with pacing. I made more little surges than I used to while racing, but that ultimately helped me hold a pretty consistent pace throughout and made sure I didn’t become too complacent:

RP10k-Apr2015-Splits

The race was well-organized and had a nice, low-key atmosphere with a reasonable but not too late start time of 9:30am. Not to mention that Regent’s Park is just lovely to run through. There were a handful of other Heathsiders racing — well done, all!

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