Tag Archives: Team Heathside

Race Recap: YMCA N London / Crouch End 10k (2018)

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Background: Another year, another YMCA North London Fun Run & Festival featuring the Crouch End 10k! I do love having a well-organized, well-supported, chip-timed 10k on my doorstep. It’s a 4-minute jog to the start in Priory Park: you can’t get better than that and there’s no excuse not to enter. And Heathsiders who don’t run are encouraged to marshal, which I did a few years ago. My running volume has been pretty high (for me) over the past month or two, as I’ve been increasing my long runs: I’m up to almost 10 miles again and feeling pretty good, although my Achilles tendons have felt tight/sore on and off for a while. (Tips for curing this more than welcome!)

Goal: Last year in this race I ran a course PB of 48:02. I know I’m in better shape now than I was then (thank you, long runs and a bit of), so I set a goal of running under 48:00.

Race strategy: Be okay with a fast first kilometer if I get swept up in the crowd. Settle into a rhythm and run a steady first 5km, ideally around 24:00 (I know I can negative split a 10k if I don’t go out too fast). Stay steady up the hill in Wood Green on the second lap (kilometer 7) and wait until entering Ally Pally for the second time (8km) before pushing. Use the downhills to make up time and run a strong last kilometer down Priory Road and back into the park.

Clubmate Alun, who I often run with at Finsbury parkrun, was also aiming for under 48:00, so I decided to keep him in my sights as well.

Weather & outfit: A little bit cool – around 15C (60F) – and sunny with not a cloud in the sky. Luckily, London has had incredible May weather this year, so I am used to running in the sun. I wore shorts, vest, and sunglasses with sunscreen a must.

Post-race. Knackered! Love my Goodr running sunglasses.

The race: I know this course quite well, having run it 3 or 4 times before. It’s two laps with a biggish hill to climb but also plenty of gradual downhill sections. I made sure to start close to the front, as the narrow Priory Park paths make for a congested first kilometer.

I got out of the park well and was pleased to run a 4:37 first kilometer – not too fast. I’d forgotten the second kilometer, through the neighborhood along the bottom of Ally Pally, was net downhill: 4:27. I knew kilometer 3 was uphill and told myself to stay steady and not push too hard up the hill, as I could make up time on the downhills later on. I went through 3km in about 14 minutes and knew I’d hit my target for 5k even if I ran the next two kilometers in 5 minutes each. Jo cheered/marshaled me down the slope into the park – a nice boost and a bit of shade before we emerged into the bright sun along the gradual uphill that’s part of the Ally Pally parkrun course. Somewhere around here, I passed Nilesh and then Alun passed me with a cheery “good morning”!

We reached 5km – “halfway!” I gasped to the runners around me – around 23:20. Well under my goal for 5km. I just hoped I hadn’t gone out too fast. The group blasting “YMCA” was out in full force, as usual, and that gave me a great boost. Stay steady, I told myself, just get around and up the hill a second time before you try to push. My feet hurt and the sun was bright. I tried to ignore it and just keep running. Calls of “Come on, Heathside” from marshals and spectators really helped.

I started to drag a little in the 7th and 8th kilometers (my slowest, at 4:51 and 4:59). But I had time to make it up and, hitting 8km at about 37:30, knew I could run two 5-minute kilometers and still finish under my goal of 48:00. I caught up with Alun around 8km – “good morning again!” – and told myself to try and stick with him. I know he has a good kick but I also know we’re of similar pace.

We slogged through Ally Pally for the second time, into the sun and slightly uphill. Rounding the bend down onto Priory Road, I gritted my teeth and said “1k to go – think of the track.” F was there cheering me on as Alun and I sped down the wide, smooth road on a slight descent. A big shout of, “Tammela Platt, you look amazing!” (or something like that) from marshaling Amy was brilliant. This is a long stretch but I willed my legs to keep turning over and willed myself to stick with Alun. We finally entered Priory Park with 500m to go. Just a few twists and turns to navigate, then we’re there. We turned the last corner with 50-100m to go and I dug in to kick to the finish. Alun pipped me by 1 second but gasped “where did your kick come from?!”. 4:09 for the last kilometer – a strong finish.

The result: Chip time of 46:18 (4:38/km, 7:28/mi average pace): this is my fastest 10k since 2015, an improvement on the 46:46 I ran at last October’s Middlesex 10k, and my best time on the Crouch End 10k course. I was 185th out of 1006 finishers and the 11th woman overall out of 413.

I wouldn’t have run such a strong finish if it hadn’t been for Alun’s company over the last two kilometers – thank you, Alun, and great job! Personalized cheers all along the course help so much; this event has such a good community atmosphere that, despite the difficulty of the course, it is always fun to run. Heathside had good turnout, with 74 runners finishing: I was 42nd of those 74 and 4th of the Heathside women who ran.

Post-race: F met me at the finish and took some photos. I chatted with a few other Heathsiders finishing but didn’t stick around too long, as it was warm and I wanted a nice, cool shower!

Next up: Regent’s Park 10k in two weeks. Let’s see if I can improve on today’s time on the much flatter course…


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50th Parkrun

It has taken me almost 5 years, but I’ve finally done it: I’ve run 50 parkruns! Remember when I ran my first parkrun in April 2013? That run is still one of my fastest parkrun times (ignorance is bliss when you don’t know about the hills on the course). I ran parkrun occasionally but not consistently for the first 4 years, but when I started getting into the 30s last summer/autumn, I resolved to make it to 50 parkruns by early 2018.

Post-50th parkrun email. In the 50 Club!

I would’ve hit 50 before this weekend if I hadn’t gotten a bad cold over Christmas – I had plans to run 2-3 parkruns over the holidays! – but here we are on 17th March 2018 and my goal has been achieved.

When you look at how many people have run upwards of 100 and even 250 parkruns, 50 doesn’t seem like much, but it still takes commitment to get up for a 9am run on a Saturday. For me, it helps that F gets up over two hours earlier (!) than me on Saturdays to cycle in Regent’s Park, so my 7:50am alarm doesn’t seem too bad compared to his wake-up time.

In celebration of my impending 50th parkrun, I baked these oatmeal raisin cookies to share around afterwards. Fellow Heathsider Shaan was running his 25th and Hannah was running her 30th parkrun, so they provided some millionaire’s shortbread (yum). Gabi mustered a few other Heathsiders to join us at Finsbury Park, and it was fun to be cheered on my milestone before the start.

Some Heathsiders post-parkrun

Did I mention it was snowing and blowing this morning? You can see bits of snow on the grass in the photo above. After a balmy week of 10+C temperatures, the mercury dropped on Friday night and Saturday morning was a brisk 2C with some gently falling snow that the wind subsequently whipped around up the backside of the Finsbury parkrun course. But we braved the elements and felt extra virtuous for it. I had a busy week and felt tired so decided to run a steady Z3/4 parkrun and came in at 24:02. Not so speedy, but a solid time and a good up-tempo run for me.

My 50th parkrun stats

Now that I have reached my 50 parkruns milestone, let’s take a moment to look at my parkrun history. While a lot of people try to run as many different parkruns as possible – dubbed ‘parkrun tourism’ – I’m a creature of habit and usually run at Finsbury Park or Ally Pally due to their proximity to my flat. I have run Hampstead Heath parkrun once and F and I even ran a parkrun in Liverpool when we were up visiting friends a few weeks ago.

I love parkrun because you can run it however you want. When I feel like testing my fitness, I’ll go to Finsbury park and hammer it (did that last weekend, hence this week’s steadier run). If I’m up for a scenic run on mainly trails, I’ll go to Ally Pally and sometimes push it but sometimes run at social pace with Gabi or Jo. I’ve volunteered twice and need to do more of that to give back to such an amazing community.

Now that I’ve reached 50 parkruns, what’s next? In general running goals, I have a number of 10k races coming up over the spring and summer so I am working on building my endurance and long run distance. Maybe I’ll try to do Hampstead Heath parkrun more often and build that into my weekly long run. We shall see. For now, I’ll rest on my small laurels and enjoy the weekend!

Parkrun tourism at Princes parkrun, Liverpool!


Race Recap: Perivale 5, 2017. A PB!

This is the fifth year in a row that I laced up on the first Sunday of December for the Perivale 5, my favorite suburban road race of an unusual distance! Running conditions were ideal: about 48F/9C and overcast with a hint of misty drizzle. I toyed with the idea of wearing gloves, but after heating up quickly in my warmup mile, I opted to go without. (Post-race note: wardrobe choice of shorts and Heathside vest was spot-on.)

Most Heathsiders post-race. Photo from Nilesh’s phone.

Having been a bit off my peak form for the past couple of years, I wanted to run a good time at this year’s Perivale 5 to prove that my fitness is coming back. I thus set the following goals for myself (always good to have a stretch goal and “backup” goal, in case things don’t go to plan):

Stretch goal: run a PB, which would be under 35:44 (my time in the 2013 edition of this race).

More realistic goal: run under 37:00 – probably doable given a recent parkrun (5k) of 22:05.

I wanted to get a good starting position, as after the first 300 meters the course turns onto a narrow sidewalk along a busy road. I snuck my way towards the front, and after a few words from the announcer – no Santa pacers this year! – we were off.

After the initial rush and right turn, Eilidh glided effortlessly past me as I greeted her and worked on settling into my own rhythm. To finish in 36:00 I needed to average about 4:28/km (I know, the race was in miles, but I’m used to pacing in kilometers these days. Plus, 5 miles is almost exactly 8 kilometers, so it wasn’t hard to work out what pace to run). I clocked 4:22 for the first kilometer and then told myself it was still very early – don’t get overeager.

6:58 for the first mile felt quick but more or less maintainable. Nilesh had gone out fast, helping me keep moving along with my eye on him. I caught him at the 2-mile marker and we checked in briefly before returning to our respective racing zones.

The first lap of the course reminded me that, although it’s flat, there are quite a lot of twists and turns. I vowed on the second lap to really use the long straight section along the busy road to make up any time lost in the twisty bits.

I had a bit of a dip in kilometer 4 (4:35), but after that I dug in and picked it up. Through 3 miles in 21:35 or so, and through 5k a minute later, I knew I could run under 36:00 if I kept up my pace. Easier said than done in the second half of a race. As planned, I tried to use kilometers 6 and 7 along the straight road to make up some time: 4:22 and 4:22, just 1km to go. Through the park and once around the track. You can do this, I told myself.

Post-race Heathsiders, take 2. Photo from Nilesh’s phone.

Cheered onto the track by the supportive marshals, my watch ticked over to 34:00. Come on, you can run 400m in less than 2 minutes. Go for the PB! Striding down the back straight, I gave it all I had (final kilometer in 4:15) to finish in 35:41 (7:08/mi, 4:26/km average pace), a PR/PB by 3 seconds! I am really pleased with the result. I finished 104th overall out of 326, 11th woman, and even ended up running a negative split:

Perivale 5 splits

Next up: possibly some more cross country, Christmastime parkruns, and a 10k in early January. Stay tuned!


Race Recap: Golden Stag Mile (#MyMile)

I ran a mile this week. So what? you say. A mile is no big deal.

What I mean to say is I raced a mile this week — on the track. Now that’s serious stuff!

The stars aligned this month as Strava (the social network for athletes) put on a 1 mile initiative, encouraging people to run a mile hard, record it, then tag it and share it with a #MyMile hashtag. Coincidentally, a north London running club was putting on the Golden Stag Mile event at Finsbury Park track, which is home base for my club‘s training sessions. A short jog from home and only £4 to enter and test my fitness with a mile on the track? Yes, please!

I have started getting back to speedwork in the past couple of months but have only managed to get to the track about once every two weeks. Not being in top speed form, I put my estimated finish time down as 6:30 and hoped to finish under that.

Luckily, I was put in a race with a few other Heathsiders whose speeds I’m somewhat familiar with. I knew if I could keep Esti and Hannah in my sights, I could run a good time. I talked strategy with a few other Heathsiders while warming up — turns out, there are conflicting views on how to pace a 1-mile race. Do you go all out and just try to finish? Do you save some for a final kick? Pace it like a 400m or 800m race (go out hard, steady, push, finish)? One guy said he breaks the mile up into 1000m, 400m, and 200m and recommended trying to stay with anyone near me, letting other runners pull me along. I liked that suggestion and decided to try and stay with people as long as I could.

Well, that worked for the first two laps of my race. I got out fast and Esti soon pulled up alongside me. We stayed more or less together for the first lap and were in a nice pack with Hannah and a couple others. They pulled away and I set my sights on staying near the man in the yellow shirt; I passed him towards the end of the second lap.

That’s when things got tough: I was in no-man’s-land with no one near me for the last 800m of the race. Not ideal. There was a guy 5 seconds ahead of me and someone 5 seconds behind me. There was no time to look at my watch — I just had to run by feel and try to keep going. My mouth was dry and my legs were tired, but I pushed as much as I could, had a little bit left to kick, and finished in an official time of 6:20.1 — an automatic PR/PB, since I’d never raced a mile before, and under my goal time! It was very hard but I felt accomplished afterwards. Heathside had a great showing and the event was really well-organized by Barnet and District AC. Looking forward to next year!


Race Recap: XC Met League #2 – Stevenage

Saturday 7 November saw the arrival of the second Start Fitness Met League Cross Country fixture of the season, in Stevenage. The course used to have a lovely section through the woods — many were dismayed to learn that this year the woods had been taken out (something about permissions for using the area and the woods getting too torn up by XC runners…what, us?!).

So this year the course at Stevenage was run solely around the undulating grassy field — two laps for the women and three for the men — with some snaking back and forth to keep things interesting. Although the women’s course was advertised at 5.8km (3.6mi), it ended up being 6.6km (4.1mi) according to my and others’ Garmin watches. I believe the men’s course was also longer than usual.

Post-race. Photo credit: Ken T.

Post-race. Photo credit: Ken T.

The most interesting part of the race had to have been the weather: windy, wet, but oddly warm for November. Proper cross country weather, some called it. There was plenty of mud to slog through and water to slosh into spikes, not to mention a brutal headwind over half the course. The Heathside ladies’ contingent stood shivering together after taking off our layers and waiting for the start, but once we started running it was quite warm.

The first bit of the course’s large lap had some ups and downs with muddy corners — spikes were a necessity — before it flattened out along the backside of the loop. When my Garmin ticked off 3km just as we finished the first lap, I knew the course would be longer than advertised. No matter, I thought, just keep running. I didn’t feel particularly energetic after a busy week with no running and not much to eat the evening before, so I didn’t push very hard but tried to run steadily and notched pretty consistent splits per kilometer: 4:42, 4:41, 4:32, 4:53, 4:43, and 4:20 pace for the last .6km to the finish. I came well back in the results, at 133rd of 218 women and the 27th of 37 Heathside ladies finishing, but am pleased and in retrospect enjoyed it.

We certainly looked a bit bedraggled and wet-rat-like after the race (see photo above), but we also felt tough and virtuous after braving the less-than-ideal conditions. Well done, Team Heathside!

Next up: Perivale 5 road race in early December

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